Acacia saligna

Accession Count: 1
Common Name: Blue Leaf Acacia, Wattle Tree
Family Name: Fabaceae
Botanical Name: Acacia saligna
Synonyms:
Family Synonyms: Leguminosae
Sub Species:
Variety:
Forma:
Cultivar:
Characteristics: Wattle tree is a tall-standing, evergreen tree, identifiable by its round, dense canopy. The foliage making up its canopy is consists of deep blue-green lanceolate phyllodes. The leaf-like structures measure anywhere from six to twelve inches in length. The blue leaf acacia is thornless and blooms masses of golden-yellow puffball flowers in the early spring (1). The flowers are scented, and the pods, which are slightly flat and hairless, form slight constrictions around the seeds, and eventually drop from the tree, contain small shiny, black seeds and a fleshy aril (5). 
Compound: Aca sal
Geographic Origin: Australia
Ecozone Origin: Australasia
Biome Origin:
Natural History: This species is native to the southwest region of Australia and has been introduced to many other parts of the world. Acacia saligna was named by John Lindley after he researched the specimens of the tree that were collected by Sir Thomas Mitchell after an expedition in Australia (6). Unfortunately, it has become known as invasive in some areas of South Africa, invading and displacing native species (2,3). This tree has been distributed to many places all around the world, Algeria, Chile, Africa, Italy, North America, and the United States to name a few (4).
Cultivation Notes: Wattle tree is a fast-growing tree that is native to the warm, dry regions of Australia. In cultivation, monthly watering is suggested and planting in sandy, well-drained or dry soil with full light is best for its growth (2,3). The wattle tree is relatively cold sensitive, preferring winter temperatures above freezing (3). It does, however, tolerate periodic flooding and requires less than 11 inches of water per year (2, 3). 
Ethnobotany: The blue leaf acacia, also known as the "wattle tree," is a popular choice for landscapes, due to its lack of thorns, scented flower  and versatility in all types of landscapes. It is not a messy tree, but it does need occasional training for a structure and shape. A. saligna is known to be great for erosion control, and is typically used as a screen or individual display. With proper training, the blue leaf acacia can also take on a shrub-like, pendulous form (1). 

Height: 16 - 20 feet
Width: 16 - 20 feet
Growth Rate: Fast Growing
Grow Season: Fall
Flower Season: Spring
Color: Yellow
Function: Screen
Spread: Non-spreading
Allergen: Non-allergenic
Invasive: Invasive
Toxicity: Benign
Hardy: Hardy
Water Use: Low water Use

Citations:
  1. Walters, James E, and Balbir Backhaus. Shade and Color with Water-Conserving Plants. Timber Press, 1992.
  2. Purdue University - Center for New Crops & Plants ProductsRetrieved September 22, 2018. 
  3. Plants For a FutureRetrieved September 22, 2018.
  4. iucngisd.org. Retrieved April 2, 2019.
  5. https://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/media/Html/acacia_saligna.htm Retrieved May 20, 2019.
  6. “Acacia Saligna.” Austrailian Government Department of the Enviroment and Energy, (n.d). Retrieved October 10, 2018. 
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Acacia saligna