Acacia jennerae

Accession Count: 1
Common Name: Coonavittra Wattle
Family Name: Fabaceae
Botanical Name: Acacia jennerae
Synonyms:
Botanical Synonyms: Racosperma jennerae (Maiden) Pedley
Family Synonyms: Leguminosae
Sub Species:
Variety:
Forma:
Cultivar:
Characteristics: Acacia jennerae is a legume-bearing evergreen tree with long, elliptical-shaped leaves measuring four to six inches in length (8). The willow-like leaves form a compact, yet lacy, canopy. This slightly weepy, canopy provides scattered shade. The tree has a vase-shape and produces medium-green to grayish leaves that contrast the reddish-colored bark, and have a leathery texture to them (8). The inflorescence are a yellow color with three to eight flower heads. The pods are a zig-zag shape and range in color from gray-brown (1) to a hard reddish-brown when mature (5).
Compound: Aca jen
Geographic Origin: Australia
Ecozone Origin: Australsia
Biome Origin:
Natural History: A. jennerae is endemic to Australia, where it can be found in Kununoppin, Wilcannia in New South Wales, The Simpson Desert, and in far south-west Queensland. Naturally growing near salt and fresh water (1), this species of tree thrives in arid to semi-arid lands and is widespread (5). 
Cultivation Notes: To start seed germination, the seed needs to have some type of damage; nicking or softening the seed coat, this coaxes them to come out of physical dormancy. After germination, begin fostering the development of the root system by arranging the irrigation emitters away from the trunk. This encourages the roots to move towards the water and nutrients and reduces wind damage when the tree is mature. Further, encouraging root development, increased surface area, and capacity for water absorption (1).
Ethnobotany: Most members of Fabaceae have high nutritional value due to their ability to fix nitrogen from the atmosphere (3). In Australia, the seeds form a staple food for the many indigenous people such as the Aborigines (6). The Walalyirrki, Lalkerrek, and Alalherrk use the seeds and gum from as a food source (7). A. jennerae is a hardy plant, thriving in relatively high temperatures while surviving temperatures as low as 15oF. When mature, this tough little tree produces a clump of trees (8). Even though Coonavittra wattle's landscape use is limited, this tree is great for arid and transition landscapes. Requiring full sun, this tree is commonly used for screen and background planting, erosion control, and re-vegetation of disturbed areas (8). Caution, as roots may be invasive if in the wrong location.

Height: 16 - 20 feet
Width: 11 - 15 feet
Growth Rate: Moderate Growing
Grow Season: Spring
Flower Season: Winter
Color: Yellow
Function: Screen
Spread: Spreading
Allergen: Non-allergenic
Invasive: Invasive
Toxicity: Benign
Hardy: Hardy
Water Use: Low water Use

Citations:
  1. aridzonetrees.com
  2. florabase.dpaw.wa.gov.au
  3. hindawi.com
  4. iucnredlist.org
  5. saseedbank.com.au
  6. hort.purdue.edu
  7.  waterconnect.sa.gov.au
  8. Jones, Warren D, and Charles M Sacamano. Landscape Plants for Dry Regions : More Than 600 Species from around the World. Fisher Books, 2000.
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Acacia jennerae