Acacia baileyana

Accession Count: 1
Common Name: Bailey's Acacia, Cootamundra Wattle
Family Name: Fabaceae
Botanical Name: Acacia baileyana
Sub Species:
Variety:
Forma:
Cultivar:
Characteristics:
Compound: Aca bai
Geographic Origin: Australia
Ecozone Origin: Australasia
Biome Origin:
Natural History: The Cootamundra Wattle is a plant native to Australia and the town of Cootamundra in New South Wales. Inhabiting both the upper and lower mountains, these plants produce many seeds and are very fast growing. They dominate the area. Seeds are mainly dispersed by birds, however according to The Blue Mountains City Council, they can be dispersed by ants, machinery, or dumped in garden waste (1). The plant produces pods that hold many seeds; these seeds live very long once in the soil. This plant has spread around by being mistaken for native wattle located in other areas and is planted. It is invasive and takes over the area rapidly. The plant can be controlled by removing and collecting all the pods before the seeds get into the soil. This way, plants can be used in urban areas for ornamental landscaping.
Cultivation Notes: Acacia baileyana  grows best in full sunlight. The plant has low water needs and is hardy to nearly 0° F. Leaf cuttings can be used for propagation. (1).
Ethnobotany:
The Acacia baileyana has many uses. It is a fantastic pioneer plant, and can be used to revitalize a damaged area such as a mine or road verge. Aboriginal Australian populations have used the wood to build spears, shields, and other weapons. The pods of the tree can be combined with water to create a paste used for healing skin rashes. A dye can be extracted from the plant for use with wool.

Height: 11 - 15 feet
Width: 16 - 20 feet
Growth Rate: Fast Growing
Grow Season: ForeSummer
Flower Season: Spring
Color: Yellow
Function: Accent
Spread:
Allergen: Allergenic
Invasive: Invasive
Toxicity: Benign
Hardy: Hardy
Water Use: Low water Use

Citations:
"Wattle, Cootamundra." Weeds of the Blue Mountains. Blue Mountains City Council, 17 Nov. 2015. Web. 09 Mar. 2017.
Muell, F. "Plants of the World Online." Acacia Baileyana. Royal Botanic Gardens, Web. 09 Mar. 2017.
Searle, Suzette. "Traditional Uses." Wattle Day. Wattle Day Association Inc., Web. 9 Mar. 2017.
"Wattle Uses." Wattle Uses. World Wide Wattle, 15 Dec. 2016. Web. 09 Mar. 2017.
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Acacia baileyana