Quercus shumardii

Accession Count: 4
Common Name: Shumard Oak
Family Name: Fagaceae
Botanical Name: Quercus shumardii
Sub Species:
Variety:
Forma:
Cultivar:
Characteristics:
Compound: Que shu
Geographic Origin: Southeastern United States
Ecozone Origin: Nearctic
Biome Origin:
Natural History:    This tree is most commonly found in central Texas and southern Oklahoma due to it's moderately high drought tolerance. Being common in these areas, the Shumard Oak is named after a Texan geologist named Benjamin Franklin Shumard (1820-69) (1). 
Cultivation Notes:    Like most oaks, the Shumard Oak is propagated most often by seed. Pre-treatment of the seeds is not necessary. They do best when planted outdoors in deep containers to leave room for the oak's initial tap root. Cold temperatures are sometimes needed to promote shoot development in many oaks (1). 
   When acorns start to form, they are best picked straight from the tree and only when their color turns brown. Acorns are most viable when planted directly after picking, rather than storing. If they cannot be planted right away, fumigate with methyl bromide and store in moist saw dust or sand (1). When planting the acorns, begin by soaking them in hot water for at least 15 minutes helps to prevent weevil infestation (1). After the soaking plant directly into a large container. The Shumard Oak grows best in moist but well-drained loamy soils with a pH around 7.5 (2)
Ethnobotany:    The Shumard Oak can be used in a variety of different ways and has many beneficial properties.The acorns of the Shumard Oak are edible once the tannins are boiled out, if the tannins are not boiled out the acorns can have a low toxicity (1). The best time to collect the acorns is during the fall when the acorns are brown, the green acorns are unripe and it is not recommended to eat them. After collection, remove the shell, cut into small pieces, and place into boiling water for 15-30 minutes (1). When the water turns brown, dump and pour new water into the pot. Continue this process until the water doesn't turn brown but stays clear, this means the tannins have been removed. After boiling the acorns they can then be roasted, blended, or ground to make a coffee substitute (1). 
   The Shumard Oak is also used by fruit-birds and mammals as a habitat. It also attracts butterflies (1).

Height: 50 - 100 feet
Width: 20 - 50 feet
Growth Rate: Fast Growing
Grow Season:
Flower Season: Spring
Color: White
Function: Shade
Spread:
Allergen: Non-allergenic
Invasive: Benign
Toxicity: Toxic
Hardy: Semi-hardy
Water Use: Moderate Water Use

Citations:
1. http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=QUSH
2. http://www.na.fs.fed.us/pubs/silvics_manual/volume_2/quercus/shumardii.htm

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Quercus shumardii