Acacia papyrocarpa

Accession Count: 1
Common Name: Western Myall
Family Name: Fabaceae
Botanical Name: Acacia papyrocarpa
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Characteristics: Bark is rough and fissured. Phyllodes (modified leaves) resemble needles from 1.5 - 4.5 inches long. They are flat and end in softly curved innocuous tips. The phyllodes are spaced ½ inch apart, giving each branch a “loose” appearance. Flowers are small yellow puffs- 2 to 5 clustered together in the leaf ails. Fruits are legumes, 3-4 inches long, and papery with a width of about 1/4 inch. They are flat and constricted between the seeds. The seeds are small, black, and very hard.
Compound: Aca pap
Geographic Origin: Australia
Ecozone Origin: Australasia
Biome Origin:
Natural History: ======================================================================= Natural History of the UA Campus Arboretum Specimen: The UA’s Acacia papyrocarpa was plated on campus during the Warren Jones era of “interesting
Cultivation Notes: A combination of events must occur for seedlings to establish: high late-summer rains, sheeting water flows which scarify the seeds (and presumably flush out ants that carry off the seeds and destroy them), shallow burying of seeds, follow-up rains that encourage seedlings, and low herbivore populations. In Western Australia, these events only occur together on average every 20 years.
Ethnobotany: The wood of Acacia papyrocarpa was used by the Aborigines for musical instruments and tools. The blue, cloud-like appearance of the Western Myall is often used in landscaping as a focal point, but needs plenty of room to spread.

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Color: Yellow
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Allergen: Non-allergenic
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Toxicity: Benign
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Alert

Acacia papyrocarpa