Eucalyptus camaldulensis

Accession Count: 28
Common Name: Red Gum Eucalyptus, Red River Gum
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Family Name: Myrtaceae
Botanical Name: Eucalyptus camaldulensis
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Characteristics: Eucalyptus camaldulensis is a massive evergreen tree which reaches heights of about 130 to 180 feet. The trunk width is usually about five to seven feet in diameter. The crown is open, widely spreading, irregular and branches tend to form not far above the ground. The bark is smooth and white, gray, buff, or brownish-red in color. The red gum has leaves typical of most eucalyptus trees, which are lanceolate in shape. The leaves are a dull green to gray-green on both sides, about three to eight inches long, and a half inch to an inch wide. The white flowers bloom in groups of five to ten mainly in the late spring and summer and followed by small light brown seed capsules.
Compound: Euc cama
Geographic Origin: Australia
Ecozone Origin: Australasia
Biome Origin:
Natural History: Eucalyptus comes from the Greek word meaning "well-capped" referring to the cap which covers the developing flowers of the genus. The species name "camaldulensis" is derived from the name Camalduli, a district in Italy. This species is thought to be the widest spread of all Eucalyptus. It is also the symbol of inland Australia.
Cultivation Notes: Eucalyptus camaldulensis is a beautiful tree with a curved trunk, and a spreading crown. Potential problems include its roots, which can be invasive in a landscape, and can grow into septic tanks and other below-ground infrastructure. The red river gum also drops large branches, and lots of litter from its leaves, shedding bark, and twigs. It is tolerant of alkaline soils. E. camaldulensis should be grown in full sunlight in a large open area, and requires regular pruning. Hardy to 20°F
Ethnobotany: E. camaldulensis has many uses. The leaves are used to obtain an essential oil used quite frequently in aromatherapy, bath, and other hygiene products. It was an important species to the Aboriginal people of inland Australia who used its wood to make canoes and its roots as a water source. The durable wood is also used frequently for construction, flooring, furniture, cabinetry, fence posts, and occasionally as pulpwood. In Sudan, it is planted around crops to protect them from the blowing sands. The red river gum tree is also an excellent producer of pollen and nectar for honey. 
In a landscape, E. camaldulensis functions as a windbreak. Because of its pendulous form, E. camaldulensis is popular as a structural tree or a skyline tree. It is suitable for large areas, and not suitable for residential or garden use.

Height: 50 - 100 feet
Width: 20 - 50 feet
Growth Rate: Moderate Growing
Grow Season: Summer
Flower Season: Winter
Color: White
Function: Shade
Spread: Spreading
Allergen: Non-allergenic
Invasive: Invasive
Toxicity: Benign
Hardy: Hardy
Water Use: Low water Use

Citations:
Jones, Warren D, and Charles M Sacamano. Landscape Plants for Dry Regions : More Than 600 Species from around the World. Fisher Books, 2000.
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Eucalyptus camaldulensis