Quercus emoryi

Accession Count: 1
Common Name: Emory Oak
Family Name: Fagaceae
Botanical Name: Quercus emoryi
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Cultivar:
Characteristics:
Compound: Que emo
Geographic Origin: Mountain Southwest
Ecozone Origin: Nearctic
Biome Origin:
Natural History: One of the most common oaks along the border with Mexico, Quercus emory’s native distribution ranges from Arizona, New Mexico, Texas and parts of Northern Mexico (1, 2). Although its population is usually relatively sparse, in areas where it is dominant it can occupy up to 50% of the canopy cover. The areas that are best for its large and abundant growth are pinyon-juniper woodlands although Emory oak is commonly found in canyons on the edge of deserts, which reach heights that range from 4,500 to 5,000 ft. The land formations where the tree grows include “alluvial fans, foothills, bajadas, barrancas, high plains, and mesas” (1).

Specifically for white tailed deer and mule deer Emory oak trees provide sustenance almost year round (1). The nectar is eaten by butterflies and moths (2). Emory oak is also used as a habitat or cover for many animals including “black bear, white-tailed deer, antelope squirrel, mice, gray fox, and raccoon” (1).
Cultivation Notes: Quercus emoryi can be propagated via seed. It is important to sown the seed quickly as it is prone to desiccation and loses vigor quickly. The tree is known to have a deep taproot and should therefore be planted into its final position as quickly as possible. After being rooted in nursery beds the plants should not stay in the beds for more than two seasons (3).
Ethnobotany: Uses range from using the wood of Emory oak for firewood and occasionally furniture to food. The acorns are eaten by a variety of forest animals as well as humans. Historically, Native Americans used the acorns as a source of flour and meal (2).

The acorns of this species are still sold as a food commodity in parts of northwestern Mexico.

Height: 50 - 100 feet
Width: 50 - 100 feet
Growth Rate: Slow Growing
Grow Season: Spring
Flower Season: Spring
Color: Yellow
Function: Accent
Spread: Spreading
Allergen: Allergenic
Invasive: Invasive
Toxicity: Benign
Hardy: Semi-hardy
Water Use: Low water Use
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Quercus emoryi