Prosopis chilensis

Accession Count: 89
Common Name: Chilean mesquite
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Family Name: Fabaceae
Botanical Name: Prosopis chilensis
Synonyms:
Family Synonyms: Leguminosae
Sub Species:
Variety:
Forma:
Cultivar:
Characteristics: The Chilean Mesquite has bipinnate leaves that are eight inches long with 14 pairs of leaflets. Each leaflet is one inch long. The water use is none to monthly and has a hardiness of 15ºF. 
Compound: Pro chi
Geographic Origin: South America
Ecozone Origin: Neotropic
Biome Origin:
Natural History: Originally discovered in Central and South America but has migrated to Africa (4). The species has survived centuries of time due to its hardy survival rate (1). It has been used as a foundational food source that has sustained humans for centuries (1). It can be easily confused with Prosopis Juliflora due to similar genetic and physical features (4).
Cultivation Notes: Grows best in arid and semi-arid climates with low water use and high sun exposure. Best planted in sandy dirt and can grow in extreme weather conditions (3). Grows to average height and produces seed pods (4); needs to be consistently weeded and pruned to maintain tree health (3).
Ethnobotany:
This species provides a food source, medicine, fuel, and timber for human consumption (3).  Also used for landscape purposes and as shade over houses and crops (2)
Provides core ingredient for animal feed and provides them with fiber and energy, but consumption of pods can cause toxic results indigestion (2).


Height: 20 - 50 feet
Width: 20 - 50 feet
Growth Rate: Fast Growing
Grow Season: Spring
Flower Season: Summer
Color: Yellow
Function: Shade
Spread: Spreading
Allergen: Allergenic
Invasive: Benign
Toxicity: Benign
Hardy: Hardy
Water Use: Low water Use

Citations:
  1. Jones, Duffield. Trees and shrubs for dry California landscapes: plants for water conservation: an introduction to more than 360 California native and introduced plants which survive with limited water. Print.
  2. Perry, Plants for the Southwest, Plants for Drylands. Print.
  3. Desert Landscape Plants
  4. Arizona Municipal Water Users Association
  5. University of Arizona Cooperative Extension
  6. University of Texas
  7. Arizona Sonoran Desert Museum
  8. Encyclopedia of Life
  9. Jones, Warren D, and Charles M Sacamano. Landscape Plants for Dry Regions: More Than 600 Species from around the World. Fisher Books, 2000.
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Prosopis chilensis