Stachys coccinea

Accession Count: 85
Common Name: Texas Betony, Scarlet Betony
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Family Name: Lamiaceae
Botanical Name: Stachys coccinea
Synonyms:
Family Synonyms: Labiatae
Sub Species:
Variety:
Forma:
Cultivar:
Characteristics: Stachys coccinea is identified by its tubular coral, red flowers, unique among its genus (2). The flowers grow in whorls of up to six near the top ends of the plant's four-sided stems, which otherwise feature pairs of green, deltoid-shaped leaves growing on opposite sides (1,3,5). The perennial grows to about one foot tall and spreads to two feet wide (5).
Compound: Sta coc
Geographic Origin: Desert Southwest, Mexico
Ecozone Origin:
Biome Origin:
Natural History: The Texas betony is native to the desert southwest, and can be found naturally from west Texas, to central Arizona and adjacent regions of northern Mexico (1,5).
Cultivation Notes: S. coccinea is known to be easy to cultivate and to have a moderate growth rate, It requires moderate water usage; although it may require additional watering if rainfall is low. It does well in both full sun and partial shade, and moist, well drained soils. The scarlet betony is cold sensitive. The tender plant can only withstand temperatures as low as 28oF (5). It is recommended that dead foliage is cut back in the winter or after a frost, to encourage healthy, dense growth (1,5).
Ethnobotany: The Texas betony is an ornamental flowering plant, best used in mini desert oasis landscapes. They are low maintenance plants, and make for great ground cover and perennial borders when used in masses (5). The flower of the Texas betony is well known for its attractiveness to humming birds. They can be seen visiting during bloom season from March to October (2).

Height: 0 - 5 feet
Width: 0 - 5 feet
Growth Rate: Moderate Growing
Grow Season: Fall
Flower Season: Spring
Color: Red
Function:
Spread: Non-spreading
Allergen: Non-allergenic
Invasive: Benign
Toxicity: Benign
Hardy: Tender
Water Use: Moderate Water Use

Citations:
1. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center
2. Mountain State Wholesale Nursery
3. SEINet
4. American Southwest 
5. Urban Landscape Committee. Desert Wildflowers. Arizona Native Plant Society, 1991. 
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Stachys coccinea